Financing Options

To Buy Property in Mexico

IBG Realtors Financing to buy real estate in Mexico banks, bitcoin, crypto, loans, mortgage credit

Can Foreigners buy beachfront property in Mexico?

Foreigners can own property in Mexico. It's perfectly legal. Outside the restricted zones—50 kilometers (about 31 miles) from shorelines and 100 kilometers (about 62 miles) from international borders—foreigners can hold the direct deed to property with the same rights and responsibilities as Mexican nationals. More information in our article "What Is a Fideicomiso Trust and Who Needs It?" or you can request a legal consultation. 

Can Us or Canadian Citizens get mortgages in Mexico?

Yes, you can. Mexico is relatively friendly when it comes to North Americans buying a property in the country, going so far as to offer mortgages to US and Canadian citizens. The first thing you need to do to purchase property in Mexico is to go to a local real estate agency and find a respected local law firm, fortunately, we team up with IBG Legal a specialized Real Estate Law firm. Our financial advisors can guide you in this process

How as a US or Canadian can get a credit in Mexico?

Any foreigner can get a credit card & a credit rating in Mexico as long as you have FM2 or FM3, which are similar to resident cards, and the actual resident cards (which are new). You also need some way to prove your income (payroll slips, tax reports, or debit/checking card deposits for 3 months) a Migration process is needed and IBG Legal can help you

Can I buy Real Estate in Mexico with Cryptocurrency?

YES! We know the top developers that accept bitcoin and cryptocurrency payments for the purchase of villas, apartments, land, commercial, and investment property. They might accept Bitcoin, Ethereum, Ada, Xrp, Litecoin, and all the main cryptos for property in Cancun, Tulum, Playa Del Carmen, and Tulum Mexico. IBG Realtors always finding the best option for YOU!  Our Legal Advisors will make sure that your investment is safe during the process.

Can Us or Canadian Citizens get financing in Mexico?

 

Mortgage financing and loans in Mexico are typically granted in Mexican pesos with the potential for loan-to-value ratios of up to 90%, with fixed-rate interest plans. Current interest rates vary between 7.9% and 10% per annum with some banks offering lower rates depending on credit ratings and eligibility. We work with all banks, some of them are international like Scotiabank, Santander, HSBC or BBVA

How buying pre-sale property in Mexico works?

Many investors are looking to buy presale because the purchase price is low since it’s a brand new property, and you have payment options during the construction of the property. There are different time frames for the delivery of presale units. Most range between 6 to 18 months period.

Example of developer payment options in presale

  • 30% Down payment – 40% in payments during construction and 30% upon delivery.

  • 50% Down payment – 30% in payments during construction and 20% upon delivery.

  • 80% Down payment – 20% upon delivery.

 

*Usually starting at 50% and above, developers offer a discount for a higher down payment.

Some options offer a 30% down payment and the remaining 70% upon delivery. This is very attractive for investors that don’t have the liquidity and would like to finance the remaining 70% with a financial institution for options contact us. 

Do You Have More Questions? 

Financial Advisory By:
Logo Infinance.png

The information contained herein should only be considered a guide is just designed to provide general information in regard to the subject matter covered and is based upon sources believed to be reliable; however, no representation or warranty is made as to its accuracy. If legal advice or other expert advice is required, the services of a competent professional should be sought. and is totally confidential between the parts involved. Readers should check primary sources where appropriate and confirm that the information has not been affected or changed by recent developments, or jurisdictional differences with transactions.